Labor Relations Update

Category Archives: Section 8(a)(5)

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Nitpicking Continues As NLRB Finds Employer’s Failure To Timely Respond To Information Request A Violation Of The Act

The Board’s fiscal year ended on September 30 with a whimper instead of a bang.  We saw a few decisions in the usual year end flurry but most of the major Board initiatives were advanced in the last two years, and so this probably is a calm before the Presidential election. Yet change still is occurring.  … Continue Reading

Contract Language Requires Continued Wage Increases Even After Expiration, rules divided NLRB

The process of collective bargaining is filled with nuance and sublety.  Unlike other business negotiations, there is often a dance that takes place as the parties attempt to reach an agreement.  Given the Act’s mandate that the parties “meet and confer” at “reasonable times” to try to reach an agreement, it is legally impossible to … Continue Reading

Duty To Provide Employee Witness Names And Pro-Union Supervisory Election Interference On This Week’s NLRA Fare

The slow pace at the NLRB continues this Spring, as only one or two decisions are issued each week.  Recent decisions, one from the NLRB and one from the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, are worth noting because they illustrate recurring themes under the NLRA.   Protecting The Identity Of Employee Informants In Alcan … Continue Reading

NLRB Acting General Counsel Clarifies Duty to Provide Information in Bargaining

In a May 17 memorandum, NLRB Acting General Counsel Lafe Solomon furnished guidelines to Regional Directors concerning parties’ obligation to provide information in collective bargaining negotiations.  GC Memorandum 11-13  traces the development of two different analytical frameworks for assessing a party’s obligation to provide requested information to its bargaining counterpart.  The first applies to cases involving … Continue Reading

NLRB Hints At Broader Agenda In Witness Statement Case

Employers faced with evidence of employee misconduct often conduct investigations.  In many cases, there is no direct evidence.  Oftetimes, there exists conflicting versions of events, and so witness statements are obtained.  The employer then can consider all the aspects of what happened, taking into consideration who saw what, and the candor of employees.  For over 32 years, such … Continue Reading
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